ClearEnergy ransomware can destroy process automation logics in critical infrastructure, SCADA and industrial control systems.

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Schneider Electric, Allen-Bradley, General Electric (GE) and more vendors are vulnerable to ClearEnergy ransomware.

Researchers at CRITIFENCE® Critical Infrastructure and SCADA/ICS Cyber Threats Research Group have demonstrated this week a new proof of concept ransomware attack aiming to erase (clear) the ladder logic diagram in Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs). The ransomware a.k.a ClearEnergy affects a massive range of PLC models of world’s largest manufacturers of SCADA and Industrial Control Systems. This includes Schneider Electric Unity series PLCs and Unity OS from version 2.6 and later, other PLC models of leading vendors include GE and Allen-Bradley (MicroLogix family) which are also found to be vulnerable to the ransomware attack.ransomware attack.ransomware a.k.a ClearEnergy affects a massive range of PLC models of world’s largest manufacturers of SCADA and Industrial Control Systems. This includes Schneider Electric Unity series PLCs and Unity OS from version 2.6 and later, other PLC models of leading vendors include GE and Allen-Bradley (MicroLogix family) which are also found to be vulnerable to the ransomware attack.

Ransomware is a type of malware that infects computers and encrypts their content with strong encryption algorithms, and then demands a ransom to decrypt that data. “ClearEnergy attack is based on the most comprehensive and dangerous vulnerability that ever found in Critical Infrastructure, SCADA and ICS Systems, and affects a wide range of vulnerable products from different manufacturers and vendors. These attacks target the most important assets and critical infrastructure and not just because they are easy to attack but also hard to be recovered”. Says Brig. Gen. (ret.) Rami Ben Efraim, CEO at CRITIFENCE.

In 2016 we have seen a rise in ransomware, where the victims were businesses or public organizations that on one hand had poor security and on the other hand the alternative cost of losing business continuity was high. Last year there were reports of a targeted ransomware for PC and other workstation within critical infrastructure, SCADA and industrial control systems. A month ago, scientists from the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering in Georgia Institute of Technology have simulated a proof-of-concept ransomware attack (LogicLocker) in a limited scope designed to attack critical infrastructure, SCADA and industrial control systems.

ClearEnergy acts similarly to other malicious ransomware programs that infect computers and encrypts their content with strong encryption algorithms, and then demands a ransom to decrypt that data back to its original form, with one major difference. ClearEnergy is a malicious ransomware attack designed to target Critical Infrastructure and SCADA systems such nuclear and power plant facilities, water and waste facilities, transportation infrastructure and more.

“Although the codename ClearEnergy, the vulnerabilities behind ClearEnergy ransomware takes us to our worst nightmares where cyber-attacks meets critical infrastructure. Attackers can now take down our electricity, our water supply and our oil and gas infrastructure by compromising power plants, water dams and nuclear plants. Critical Infrastructure are the place in which terrorists, activists, criminals and state actors can make the biggest effect. They have the motivation, and ClearEnergy shows that they have also the opportunity.” Says Brig. Gen. (ret.) Rami Ben Efraim, CEO at CRITIFENCE.

Once ClearEnergy is executed on the victim machine it will search for vulnerable PLCs in order to grab the ladder logic diagram from the PLC and will try to upload it to a remote server. Finally ClearEnergy will start a timer that will trigger a process to wipe the logic diagram from all PLCs after one hour unless the victim will pay in order to cancel the timer and to stop the attack.

SCADA and Industrial Control Systems has been found to be weak in the recent years, against numerous types of attacks that result in damages in a form of loss of service which translate to a power outage, or sabotage. The damage that ClearEnergy attack can cause to the critical infrastructure is high since it can cause a power failure and other damages to field equipment, thus making the recovery process slow in most cases, and might even bring a plant to a halt.

ClearEnergy, which is based on vulnerabilities CVE-2017-6032 (SVE-82003203) and CVE-2017-6034 (SVE-82003204) that have been discovered by CRITIFENCE security researchers, disclosed profound security flaws in the UMAS protocol of the vendor Schneider Electric. UMAS protocol seems to suffer from critical vulnerabilities in the form of bad design of the protocol session key, which results in authentication bypass. “UMAS is a Kernel level protocol and an administrative control layer used in Unity series PLC and Unity OS from 2.6. It relies on the Modicon Modbus protocol, a common protocol in Critical Infrastructure, SCADA and industrial control systems and used to access both unallocated and allocated Memory from PLC to SCADA system. What worries our researchers is that it may not be entirely patched within the coming years, since it affecta a wide range of hardware and vendors.” Says Mr. Eran Goldstein, CTO and Founder of CRITIFENCE.

Following to the disclosure, Schneider Electric has confirmed that the Modicon family of PLCs products are vulnerable to the findings presented by CRITIFENCE and released an Important Cybersecurity Notification (SEVD-2017-065-01). ICS-CERT, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released an important advisory earlier this morning ([April 11, 2017] ICSA-17-101-01). The basic flaws, which was confirmed by Schneider Electric, allows an attacker to guess a weak (1-byte length) session key easily (256 possibilities) or even to sniff it. Using the session key, the attacker is able to get a full control of the controller, to read controller’s program and rewriting it back with the malicious code.

“The recovery process from this type of cyber-attacks can be very hard and slow in most cases due to lack of management resources in the field of SCADA and process automation. Slow recovery process multiplied by the number of devices need be fixed, as well configuration restoration makes the recovery processes very painful”. Says Mr. Alexey Baltacov, Critical Infrastructure Architect at CRITIFENCE

“Recovering from such an attack would be a slow and tedious process, and prone to many failures. Every plant using PLC’s which is part of a production line and would have dozens of these devices all around the plant. Let’s assume that each PLC is indeed backed-up to its recent configuration. It would take a painstakingly long time to recover each and every one of them to its original status.” Says Mr. Eyal Benderski, Head of the Critical Infrastructure and SCADA/ICS Cyber Threats Research Group at CRITIFENCE. “This restoration process would take a long time, on which the plant would be completely shut down. The costs of that shut down could be substantial, and for critical processes it could affect for more than the down-time, as it is the case with energy plants. Consider a process which relies on keeping a constant temperature for a biological agent or chemical process. Breaking the process chain could require re-initialization that may be days and weeks long. Furthermore, since dealing with the OT network is much more complicated for operational reasons, on many occasions plants don’t even have up-to-date backups, which would require complete reconfiguration of the manufacturing process. Given these complications, plants would very much prefer paying the ransom than dealing with the minor chance that the backups will work as expected. Lastly, let’s assume the backups went on-air as soon as possible, what would prevent the same attack from recurring, even after paying?”

About the author:

CRITIFENCE is a leading Critical Infrastructure, SCADA and Industrial Control Systems cyber security firm. The company developed and provides SCADAGate+ unique passive cyber security technology and solutions designed for Critical Infrastructure, SCADA and Industrial Control Systems visibility and vulnerability assessment,  which allow to monitor, control and to analyze OT network cyber security events and vulnerabilities easily and entirely passively. CRITIFENCE development team and Critical Infrastructure and SCADA/ICS Cyber Threats Research Group combined from top experienced SCADA and cyber security experts and researchers of the IDF’s Technology & Intelligence Unit 8200 (Israel’s NSA) and the Israeli Air Force (IAF).

For more information about CRITIFENCE refer to: http://www.critifence.com

References

Vulnerabilities

CVE-2017-6032 http://www.cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=2017-6032

CVE-2017-6034 http://www.cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=2017-6034

SVE-82003203 http://www.critifence.com/sve/sve.php?id=82003203

SVE-82003204 http://www.critifence.com/sve/sve.php?id=82003204

Source code

ClearEnergy | UMASploit – https://github.com/0xICF/ClearEnergy

Advisories

Schneider Electric – SEVD-2017-065-01

ICS-CERT, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) – ICSA-17-101-01

 

News

SecurityAffairs – http://securityaffairs.co/wordpress/57731/malware/clearenergy-ransomware-scada.html

0xICF – https://0xicf.wordpress.com/2017/04/09/clearenergy-ransomware-can-destroy-process-automation-logics-in-critical-infrastructure-scada-and-industrial-control-systems/

VirusGuides – http://virusguides.com/clearenergy-ransomware-targets-critical-infrastructure-scada-industrial-control-systems/

CRITIFENCE – http://critifence.com/blog/clear_energy/

Physical Backdoor | Remote Root Vulnerability in HID Door Controllers

If you’ve ever been inside an airport, university campus, hospital, government complex, or office building, you’ve probably seen one of HID’s brand of card readers standing guard over a restricted area. HID is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of access control systems and has become a ubiquitous part of many large companies’ physical security posture. Each one of those card readers is attached to a door controller behind the scenes, which is a device that controls all the functions of the door including locking and unlocking, schedules, alarms, etc.

In recent years, these door controllers have been given network interfaces so that they can be managed remotely. It is very handy for pushing out card database updates and schedules, but as with everything else on the network, there is a risk of remotely exploitable vulnerabilities. And in the case of physical security systems, that risk is more tangible than usual.

HID’s two flagship lines of door controllers are their VertX and Edge platforms. In order for these controllers to be easily integrated into existing access control setups, they have a discoveryd service that responds to a particular UDP packet. A remote management system can broadcast a “discover” probe to port 4070, and all the door controllers on the network will respond with information such as their mac address, device type, firmware version, and even a common name (like “North Exterior Door”). That is the only purpose of this service as far as I can tell. However, it is not the only function of this service. For some reason, discoveryd also contains functionality for changing the blinking pattern of the status LED on the controller. This is accomplished by sending a “command_blink_on” packet to the discoveryd service with the number of times for the LED to blink. Discoveryd then builds up a path to /mnt/apps/bin/blink and calls system() to run the blink program with that number as an argument.

And you can probably guess what comes next.

A command injection vulnerability exists in this function due to a lack of any sanitization on the user-supplied input that is fed to the system() call. Instead of a number of times to blink the LED, if we send a Linux command wrapped in backticks, like `id`, it will get executed by the Linux shell on the device. To make matters worse, the discovery service runs as root, so whatever command we send it will also be run as root, effectively giving us complete control over the device. Since the device in this case is a door controller, having complete control includes all of the alarm and locking functionality. This means that with a few simple UDP packets and no authentication whatsoever, you can permanently unlock any door connected to the controller. And you can do this in a way that makes it impossible for a remote management system to relock it. On top of that, because the discoveryd service responds to broadcast UDP packets, you can do this to every single door on the network at the same time!

Needless to say, this is a potentially devastating bug. The Zero Day Initiative team worked with HID to see that it got fixed, and a patch is reportedly available now through HID’s partner portal, but I have not been able to verify that fix personally. It also remains to be seen just how quickly that patch will trickle down into customer deployments. TippingPoint customers have been protected ahead of a patch for this vulnerability since September 22, 2015 with Digital Vaccine filter 20820.

 

 

Credit:  Ricky Lawshae

Kemuri Water Company (KWC) | Hackers change chemical settings at water treatment plant

The unnamed water district had asked Verizon to assess its networks for indications of a security breach. It said there was no evidence of unauthorized access, and the assessment was a proactive measure as part of ongoing efforts to keep its systems and networks healthy.

Verizon examined the company’s IT systems, which supported end users and corporate functions, as well as Operational Technology (OT) systems, which were behind the distribution, control and metering of the regional water supply.

The assessment found several high-risk vulnerabilities on the Internet-facing perimeter and said that the OT end relied heavily on antiquated computer systems running operating systems from 10 or more years ago.

Many critical IT and OT functions ran on a single IBM AS/400 system which the company described as its SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) platform. This system ran the water district’s valve and flow control application that was responsible for manipulating hundreds of programmable logic controllers (PLCs), and housed customer and billing information, as well as the company’s financials.

Interviews with the IT network team uncovered concerns surrounding recent suspicious cyber activity and it emerged that an unexplained pattern of valve and duct movements had occurred over the previous 60 days. These movements consisted of manipulating the PLCs that managed the amount of chemicals used to treat the water to make it safe to drink, as well as affecting the water flow rate, causing disruptions with water distribution, Verizon reported.

An analysis of the company’s internet traffic showed that some IP addresses previously linked to hacktivist attacks had connected to its online payment application.

Verizon said that it “found a high probability that any unauthorized access on the payment application would also expose sensitive information housed on the AS/400 system.” The investigation later showed that the hackers had exploited an easily identified vulnerability in the payment application, leading to the compromise of customer data. No evidence of fraudulent activity on the stolen accounts could be confirmed.

However, customer information was not the full extent of the breach. The investigation revealed that, using the same credentials found on the payment app webserver, the hackers were able to interface with the water district’s valve and flow control application, also running on the AS/400 system.

During these connections, they managed to manipulate the system to alter the amount of chemicals that went into the water supply and thus interfere with water treatment and production so that the recovery time to replenish water supplies increased. Thanks to alerts, the company was able to quickly identify and reverse the chemical and flow changes, largely minimizing the impact on customers. No clear motive for the attack was found, Verizon noted.

The company has since taken remediation measures to protect its systems.

In its concluding remarks on the incident, Verizon said: “Many issues like outdated systems and missing patches contributed to the data breach — the lack of isolation of critical assets, weak authentication mechanisms and unsafe practices of protecting passwords also enabled the threat actors to gain far more access than should have been possible.”

Acknowledging that the company’s alert functionality played a key role in detecting the chemical and flow changes, Verizon said that implementation of a “layered defense-in-depth strategy” could have detected the attack earlier, limiting its success or preventing it altogether.

 

About the attack [UPDATED]

A “hacktivist” group with ties to Syria compromised Kemuri Water Company’s computers after exploiting unpatched web vulnerabilities in its internet-facing customer payment portal, it is reported.

The hack – which involved SQL injection and phishing – exposed KWC’s ageing AS/400-based operational control system because login credentials for the AS/400 were stored on the front-end web server. This system, which was connected to the internet, managed programmable logic controllers (PLCs) that regulated valves and ducts that controlled the flow of water and chemicals used to treat it through the system. Many critical IT and operational technology functions ran on a single AS400 system, a team of computer forensic experts from Verizon subsequently concluded.

Our endpoint forensic analysis revealed a linkage with the recent pattern of unauthorised crossover. Using the same credentials found on the payment app webserver, the threat actors were able to interface with the water district’s valve and flow control application, also running on the AS400 system. We also discovered four separate connections over a 60-day period, leading right up to our assessment.During these connections, the threat actors modified application settings with little apparent knowledge of how the flow control system worked. In at least two instances, they managed to manipulate the system to alter the amount of chemicals that went into the water supply and thus handicap water treatment and production capabilities so that the recovery time to replenish water supplies increased. Fortunately, based on alert functionality, KWC was able to quickly identify and reverse the chemical and flow changes, largely minimising the impact on customers. No clear motive for the attack was found.

Verizon’s RISK Team uncovered evidence that the hacktivists had manipulated the valves controlling the flow of chemicals twice – though fortunately to no particular effect. It seems the activists lacked either the knowledge of SCADA systems or the intent to do any harm.

The same hack also resulted in the exposure of personal information of the utility’s 2.5 million customers. There’s no evidence that this has been monetized or used to commit fraud.

Nonetheless, the whole incident highlights the weaknesses in securing critical infrastructure systems, which often rely on ageing or hopelessly insecure setups.

 

KWC

 

More Information

Monzy Merza, Splunk’s director of cyber research and chief security evangelist, commented: “Dedicated and opportunistic attackers will continue to exploit low-hanging fruit present in outdated or unpatched systems. We continue to see infrastructure systems being targeted because they are generally under-resourced or believed to be out of band or not connected to the internet.”

“Beyond the clear need to invest in intrusion detection, prevention, patch management and analytics-driven security measures, this breach underscores the importance of actionable intelligence. Reports like Verizon’s are important sources of insight. Organisations must leverage this information to collectively raise the bar in security to better detect, prevent and respond to advanced attacks. Working collectively is our best route to getting ahead of attackers,” he added.

Reports that hackers have breached water treatment plants are rare but not unprecedented. For example, computer screenshots posted online back in November 2011 purported to show the user interface used to monitor and control equipment at the Water and Sewer Department for the City of South Houston, Texas by hackers who claimed to have pwned its systems. The claim followed attempts by the US Department of Homeland Security to dismiss a separate water utility hack claim days earlier.

More recently hackers caused “serious damage” after breaching a German steel mill and wrecking one of its blast furnaces, according to a German government agency. Hackers got into production systems after tricking victims with spear phishing emails, said the agency.

Spear phishing also seems to have played a role in attacks lining the BlackEnergy malware against power utilities in the Ukraine and other targets last December. The malware was used to steal user credentials as part of a complex attack that resulted in power outages that ultimately left more than 200,000 people temporarily without power on 23 December.

 

Credit:  watertechonline, theregister

OnionDog APT targets Critical Infrastructures and Industrial Control Systems (ICS)

The Helios Team at 360 SkyEye Labs revealed that a group named OnionDog has been infiltrating and stealing information from the energy, transportation and other infrastructure industries of Korean-language countries through the Internet.

OnionDog

OnionDog’s first activity can be traced back to October, 2013 and in the following two years it was only active between late July and early September. The self-set life cycle of a Trojan attack is 15 days on average and is distinctly organizational and objective-oriented.

OnionDog malware is transmitted by taking advantage of the vulnerability of the popular office software Hangul in Korean-language countries, and it attacked network-isolated targets through a USB worm.

Targeting the infrastructure industry

OnionDog concentrated its efforts on infrastructure industries in Korean-language countries. In 2015 this organization mainly attacked harbors, VTS, subways, public transportation and other transportation systems. In 2014 it attacked many electric power and water resources corporations as well as other energy enterprises.

The Helios Team has found 96 groups of malicious code, 14 C&C domain names and IP related to OnionDog. It first surfaced in October 2013, and then was most active in the summers of the following years. The Trojan set its own “active state” time and the shortest was be three days and maximum twenty nine days, from compilation to the end of activity. The average life cycle is 15 days, which makes it more difficult for the victim enterprises to notice and take actions than those active for longer period of time.

OnionDog’s attacks are mainly carried out in the form of spear phishing emails. The early Trojan used icons and file numbers to create a fake HWP file (Hangul’s file format). Later on, the Trojan used a vulnerability in an upgraded version of Hangul, which imbeds malicious code in a real HWP file. Once the file is opened, the vulnerability will be triggered to download and activate the Trojan.

Since most infrastructure industries, such as the energy industry, generally adopt intranet isolation measures, OnionDog uses the USB disk drive ferry to break the false sense of security of physical isolation. In the classic APT case of the Stuxnet virus, which broke into an Iranian nuclear power plant, the virus used an employee’s USB disk to circumvent network isolation. OnionDog also used this channel and generated USB worms to infiltrate the target internal network.

“OCD-type” intensive organization

In the Malicious Code activities of OnionDog, there are strict regulations:

First, the Malicious Code has strict naming rules starting from the path of created PDB (symbol file). For example, the path for USB worm is APT-USB, and the path for spear mail file is APT-WebServer;

When the OnionDog Trojan is successfully released, it will communicate to a C&C (Trojan server), download other malware and save them in the %temp% folder and use “XXX_YYY.jpg” uniformly as the file name. These names have their special meaning and usually point to the target.

All signs show that OnionDog has strict organization and arrangement across its attack time, target, vulnerability exploration and utilization, and malicious code. At the same time, it is very cautious about covering up its tracks.

In 2014, OnionDog used many fixed IPs in South Korea as its C&C sites. Of course, this does not mean that the attacker is located in South Korea. These IPs could be used as puppets and jumping boards. By 2015, OnionDog website communications were upgraded to Onion City across the board. This is so far a relatively more advanced and covert method of network communication among APT attacks.

Onion City means that the deep web searching engine uses Tor2web agent technology to visit the anonymous Tor network deeply without using the Onion Brower specifically. And OnionDog uses the Onion City to hide the Trojan-controlling server in the Tor network.

In recent years, APT attacks on infrastructure facilities and large-scale enterprises have frequently emerged. Some that attack an industrial control system, such as Stuxnet, Black Energy and so on, can have devastating results. Some attacks are for the purpose of stealing information, such as the Lazarus hacker organization jointly revealed by Kaspersky, AlienVault lab and Novetta, and OnionDog which was recently exposed by the 360 Helios team. These secret cybercrimes can cause similarly serious losses as well.

 

 

Credit:  helpnetsecurity