Waze | Another way to track your moves

Millions of drivers use Waze, a Google-owned navigation app, to find the best, fastest route from point A to point B. And according to a new study, all of those people run the risk of having their movements tracked by hackers.

Researchers at the University of California-Santa Barbara recently discovered a Waze vulnerability that allowed them to create thousands of “ghost drivers” that can monitor the drivers around them—an exploit that could be used to track Waze users in real-time. They proved it to me by tracking my own movements around San Francisco and Las Vegas over a three-day period.

“It’s such a massive privacy problem,” said Ben Zhao, professor of computer science at UC-Santa Barbara, who led the research team.

Here’s how the exploit works. Waze’s servers communicate with phones using an SSL encrypted connection, a security precaution meant to ensure that Waze’s computers are really talking to a Waze app on someone’s smartphone. Zhao and his graduate students discovered they could intercept that communication by getting the phone to accept their own computer as a go-between in the connection. Once in between the phone and the Waze servers, they could reverse-engineer the Waze protocol, learning the language that the Waze app uses to talk to Waze’s back-end app servers. With that knowledge in hand, the team was able to write a program that issued commands directly to Waze servers, allowing the researchers to populate the Waze system with thousands of “ghost cars”—cars that could cause a fake traffic jam or, because Waze is a social app where drivers broadcast their locations, monitor all the drivers around them.

 

The attack is similar to one conducted by Israeli university students two years ago, who used emulators to send traffic bots into Waze and create the appearance of a traffic jam. But an emulator, which pretends to be a phone, can only create the appearance of a few vehicles in the Waze system. The UC-Santa Barbara team, on the other hand, could run scripts on a laptop that created thousands of virtual vehicles in the Waze system that can be sent into multiple grids on a map for complete surveillance of a given area.

In a test of the discovery, Zhao and his graduate students tried the hack on a member of their team (with his permission).

“He drove 20 to 30 miles and we were able to track his location almost the whole time,” Zhao told me. “He stopped at gas stations and a hotel.”

 

Last week, I tested the Waze vulnerability myself, to see how successfully the UC-Santa Barbara team could track me over a three-day period. I told them I’d be in Las Vegas and San Francisco, and where I was staying—the kind of information a snoopy stalker might know about someone he or she wanted to track. Then, their ghost army tried to keep tabs on where I went.

Users could be tracked right now and never know it.

– Ben Zhao, UC-Santa Barbara computer science professor
 

The researchers caught my movements on three occasions, including when I took a taxi to downtown Las Vegas for dinner:

And they caught me commuting to work on the bus in San Francisco. (Though they lost me when I went underground to take the subway.)

The security researchers were only able to track me while I was in a vehicle with Waze running in the foreground of my smartphone. Previously, they could track someone even if Waze was just running in the background of the phone. Waze, an Israeli start-up, was purchased by Google in 2013 for $1.1 billion. Zhao informed the security team at Google about the problem and made a version of the paper about their findings public last year. An update to the app in January of this year prevents it from broadcasting your location when the app is running in the background, an update that Waze described as an energy-saving feature. (So update your Waze app if you haven’t done so recently!)

“Waze constantly improves its mechanisms and tools to prevent abuse and misuse. To that end, Waze is regularly in contact with the security and privacy research community—we appreciate their help protecting our users,” said a Waze spokesperson in an emailed statement. “This group of researchers connected with us in 2014, and we have already addressed some of their claims, implementing safeguards in our system to protect the privacy of our users.”

The spokesperson said that “the concept of Waze is that we all work together to share information and impact the world around us” and that “users expect to offer certain information about their route in exchange for unparalleled navigation assistance.” Among the safeguards deployed by Waze is a “system of cloaking” so that a user’s location as displayed “from time to time within the Waze application does not represent such user’s actual, real time location.”


But those safeguards did not prevent real-time tracking in my case. The researchers sent me their tracking minutes after my trips, with accurate time stamps for each of my locations, meaning this cloaking system doesn’t seem to work very well.

“Anyone could be doing this [tracking of Waze users] right now,” said Zhao. “It’s really hard to detect.”

Part of what allowed the researchers to track me so closely is the social nature of Waze and the fact that the app is designed to share users’ geolocation information with each other. The app shows you other Waze drivers on the road around you, along with their usernames and how fast they’re going. (Users can opt of this by going invisible.) When I was in Vegas, the researchers simply populated ghost cars around the hotel I was staying at that were programmed to follow me once I was spotted.

“You could scale up to real-time tracking of millions of users with just a handful of servers,” Zhao told me. “If I wanted to, I could easily crawl all of the U.S. in real time. I have 50-100 servers, and could get more from [Amazon Web Services] and then I could track all of the drivers.”

Theoretically, a hacker could use this technique to go into the Waze system and download the activity of all the drivers using it. If they made the data public like the Ashley Madison hackers did, the public would suddenly have the opportunity to follow the movements of the over 50 million people who use Waze. If you know where someone lives, you would have a good idea of where to start tracking them.

Like the Israeli researchers, Zhao’s team was also able to easily create fake traffic jams. They were wary of interfering with real Waze users so they ran their experiments from 2 a.m. to 5 a.m. every night for two weeks, creating the appearance of heavy traffic and an accident on a remote road outside of Baird, Texas.

“No real humans were harmed or even interacted with,” said Zhao. They aborted the experiment twice after spotting real world drivers within 10 miles of their ghost traffic jam.

 

While Zhao defended the team’s decision to run the experiment live on Waze’s system, he admitted they were “very nervous” about initially making their paper about their findings public. They had approval from their IRB, a university ethics board; took precautions not to interfere with any real users; and notified Google’s security team about their findings They are presenting their paper at a conference called MobiSys, which focuses on mobile systems, at the end of June in Singapore.

 

“We needed to get this information out there,” said Zhao. “Sitting around and not telling the public and the users isn’t an option. They could be tracked right now and never know it.”

“This is bigger than Waze,” continued Zhao. The attack could work against any app, said Zhao, turning their servers into an open system that an attacker can mine and manipulate. With Waze, it’s a particularly sensitive attack because users’ location information is being broadcast and can be downloaded, but the attack on another app would allow hackers to download any information that users broadcast to other users or allow them to flood the app with fake traffic.

“With a [dating app], you could flood an area with your own profile or robot profiles and basically ruin it for your area,” said Zhao. “We looked at a bunch of different apps and nearly all of them had this near-catastrophic vulnerability.”

The scary part, said Zhao, is that “we don’t know how to stop this.” He said that servers that interact with apps in general are not as robust against attack as those that are web-facing.

“Not being able to separate a real device from a program is a larger problem,” said Zhao. “It’s not cheap and it’s not easy to solve. Even if Google wanted to do something, it’s not trivial for them to solve. But I want them to get this on the radar screen and help try to solve the problem. If they lead and they help, this collective problem will be solved much faster than if they don’t.”

“Waze is building their platform to be social so that you can track people around you. By definition this is going to be possible,” said Jonathan Zdziarski, a smartphone forensic scientist, who reviewed the paper at my request. “The crowd sourced tools that are being used in these types of services definitely have these types of data vulnerabilities.”

Zdziarski said there are ways to prevent this kind of abuse, by for example, rate-limiting data requests. Zhao told me his team has been running its experiments since the spring of 2014, and Waze hasn’t blocked them, even though they have created the appearance of thousands of Waze users in a short period of time coming from just a few IP addresses.

Waze’s spokesperson said the company is “examining the new issue raised by the researchers and will continue to take the necessary steps to protect the privacy of our users.”

In the meantime, if you need to use Waze to get around but are wary of being tracked, you do have one option: set your app to invisible mode. But beware, Waze turns off invisible mode every time you restart the app.

Full paper here.

Credit:

Advertisements

OmniRAT – the $25 way to hack into Windows, OS X and Android devices

 

Just last week, police forces across Europe arrested individuals who they believed had been using the notorious DroidJack malware to spy on Android users.

Now attention has been turned on to another piece of software that can spy on communications, secretly record conversations, snoop on browsing histories and take complete control of a remote device. But, unlike DroidJack, OmniRAT doesn’t limit itself to Android users – it can also hijack computers running Windows and Mac OS X too.

And that’s not the only difference between DroidJack and OmniRAT. Both of them may be being sold openly online, but OmniRAT retails for as little as $25 compared to DroidJack’s more hefty $210.

Security researchers at the anti-virus company Avast describe OmniRAT as a “Remote Administration Tool.

And it certainly can be used for entirely legitimate purposes, with the permission and consent of the owners of Android, Mac and Windows computers it tries to control.

But, in the wrong hands, it can also be considered a “Remote Access Trojan” – giving malicious hackers an opportunity to sneakily spy on and steal from unsuspecting users duped into installing the code.

OmniRAT

In his blog post, researcher Nikolaos Chrysaidos describes how he believes hackers have infected Androids with OmniRAT after sending an SMS.

Apparently, a German Android user explained on the Techboard-online forum how he had received an SMS telling him that an MMS had not been delivered directly to him due to the StageFright vulnerability.

In order to access the MMS, the user was told to follow a bit.ly link within three days, and enter a PIN code.

However, as Crysaidos explains, visiting the URL would initiate the attempt to install OmniRAT onto the target’s Android device:

Once you enter your number and code, an APK, mms-einst8923, is downloaded onto the Android device. The mms-einst8923.apk, once installed, loads a message onto the phone saying that the MMS settings have been successfully modified and loads an icon, labeled “MMS Retrieve” onto the phone.

Once the icon is opened by the victim, mms-einst8923.apk extracts OmniRat, which is encoded within the mms-einst8923.apk. In the example described on Techboard-online, a customized version of OmniRat is extracted.

Android app icon

Perhaps the long list of permissions requested by the app would make you think twice, if it weren’t so common for so many popular apps in the Google Play store to make similar requests.

App permissions

The problem of course is that through its cunning social engineering, and the target’s keen attempt to view the MMS that they might have been sent, it may be all too likely that the user grants permission for the app to be installed without thinking of the possible consequences.

And, as the app is capable of sending its own SMS messages, it may be that your infected Android device could then send further messages with malicious intent to your friends, family and colleagues, in the hope of hijacking further devices. After all, users are more likely to be tricked into believing a message is legitimate, and letting their guard down, if they receive a message apparently coming from someone they know and trust.

Sadly victims will probably have no clue that their devices are compromised, and even if they uninstall the MMS Retrieve icon, the customised version of OmniRAT remains installed on their Android smartphone, and will be sending data to a command and control (C&C) server seemingly based in Russia:

Russian domain

So, the question to ask is how should you protect yourself?

Well, clearly you should resist the urge to install apps onto your smartphone from anywhere other than the official app stores. Although malware has unfortunately snuck into the Google Play store in the past, you’re much more likely to encounter malicious code from unauthorised sources.

Furthermore, I would recommend running a security product on your Android device to detect malicious code and that – if possible – you keep your Android smartphone patched with the latest version of the operating system.

Finally, always think long and hard before clicking on links from untrusted sources. It could be that you’re just one click away from a hacker trying to take remote control of your Android phone.

 

 

Credit: 

iBackDoor: High-Risk Code Hits iOS Apps

Introduction

FireEye mobile researchers recently discovered potentially “backdoored” versions of an ad library embedded in thousands of iOS apps originally published in the Apple App Store. The affected versions of this library embedded functionality in iOS apps that used the library to display ads, allowing for potential malicious access to sensitive user data and device functionality.

These potential backdoors could have been controlled remotely by loading JavaScript code from a remote server to perform the following actions on an iOS device:

  • Capture audio and screenshots
  • Monitor and upload device location
  • Read/delete/create/modify files in the app’s data container
  • Read/write/reset the app’s keychain (e.g., app password storage)
  • Post encrypted data to remote servers
  • Open URL schemes to identify and launch other apps installed on the device
  • “Side-load” non-App Store apps by prompting the user to click an “Install” button

The offending ad library contained identifying data suggesting that it is a version of the mobiSage SDK [1]. We found 17 distinct versions of the potentially backdoored ad library: version codes 5.3.3 to 6.4.4. However, in the latest mobiSage SDK publicly released by adSage [2] – version 7.0.5 – the potential backdoors are not present. It is unclear whether the potentially backdoored versions of the ad library were released by adSage or if they were created and/or compromised by a malicious third party.

As of November 4, we have identified 2,846 iOS apps containing the potentially backdoored versions of mobiSage SDK. Among these, we observed more than 900 attempts to contact an ad adSage server capable of delivering JavaScript code to control the backdoors. We notified Apple of the complete list of affected apps and technical details on October 21, 2015.

While we have not observed the ad server deliver any malicious commands intended to trigger the most sensitive capabilities such as recording audio or stealing sensitive data, affected apps periodically contact the server to check for new JavaScript code. In the wrong hands, malicious JavaScript code that triggers the potential backdoors could be posted to eventually be downloaded and executed by affected apps.

Technical Details

As shown in Figure 1, the affected mobiSage library included two key components, separately implemented in Objective-C and JavaScript. The Objective-C component, which we refer to as msageCore, implements the underlying functionality of the potential backdoors and exposed interfaces to the JavaScript context through a WebView. The JavaScript component, which we refer to as msageJS, provides high-level execution logic and can trigger the potential backdoors by invoking the interfaces exposed by msageCore. Each component has its own separate version number.

Figure 1: Key components of backdoored mobiSage SDK

In the remainder of this section, we reveal internal details of msageCore, including its communication channel and high-risk interfaces. Then we describe how msageJS is launched and updated, and how it can trigger the backdoors.

Backdoors in msageCore

Communication channel

MsageCore implements a general framework to communicate with msageJS via the ad library’s WebView. Commands and parameters are passed via specially crafted URLs in the format adsagejs://cmd&parameter. As shown in the reconstructed code fragment in Figure 2, msageCore fetches the command and parameters from the JavaScript context and inserts them in its command queue.

Figure 2: Communication via URL loading in WebView

To process a command in its queue, msageCore dispatches the command, along with its parameters, to a corresponding Objective-C class and method. Figure 3 shows portions of the reconstructed command dispatching code.

Figure 3: Command dispatch in msageCore

At-risk interfaces

Each dispatched command ultimately arrives at an Objective-C class in msageCore. Table 1 shows a subset of msageCore classes and the corresponding interfaces that they expose.

msageCore Class Name Interfaces
MSageCoreUIManagerPlugin – captureAudio:

– captureImage:

– openMail:

– openSMS:

– openApp:

– openInAppStore:

– openCamera:

– openImagePicker:

– …

MSageCoreLocation – start:

– stop:

– setTimer:

– returnLocationInfo:webViewId:

– …

MSageCorePluginFileModule – createDir

– deleteDir:

– deleteFile:

– createFile:

– getFileContent:

– …

MSageCoreKeyChain – writeKeyValue:

– readValueByKey:

– resetValueByKey:

MSageCorePluginNetWork – sendHttpGet:

– sendHttpPost:

– sendHttpUpload:

– …

MSageCoreEncryptPlugin – MD5Encrypt:

– SHA1Encrypt:

– AESEncrypt:

– AESDecrypt:

– DESEncrypt:

– DESDecrypt:

– XOREncrypt:

– XORDecrypt:

– RC4Encrypt:

– RC4Decrypt

– …

Table 1: Selected interfaces exposed by msageCore

The selected interfaces reveal some of the key capabilities exposed by the potential backdoors in the library. They expose the potential ability to capture audio and screenshots while the affected app is in use, identify and launch other apps installed on the device, periodically monitor location, read and write files in the app’s data container, and read/write/reset “secure” keychain items stored by the app. Additionally, any data collected via these interfaces can be encrypted with various encryption schemes and uploaded to a remote server.

Beyond the selected interfaces, the ad library potentially exposed users to additional risks by including logic to promote and install “enpublic” apps as shown in Figure 4. As we have highlighted in previous blogs [footnotes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], enpublic apps can introduce additional security risks by using private APIs in certain versions of iOS. These private APIs potentially allow for background monitoring of SMS or phone calls, breaking the app sandbox, stealing email messages, and demolishing arbitrary app installations. Apple has addressed a number of issues related to enpublic apps that we have brought to their attention.

Figure 4: Installing “enpublic” apps to bypass Apple App Store review

We can see how this ad library functions by examining the implementations of some of the selected interfaces. Figure 5 shows reconstructed code snippets for capturing audio. Before storing recorded audio to a file audio_xxx.wav, the code retrieves two parameters from the command for recording duration and threshold.

Figure 5: Capturing audio with duration and threshold

Figure 6 shows a code snippet for initializing the app’s keychain before reading. The accessed keychain is in the kSecClassGenericPassword class, which is widely used by apps for storing secret credentials such as passwords.

Figure 6: Reading the keychain in the kSecClassGenericPassword class

Remote control in msageJS

msageJS contains JavaScript code for communicating with a remote server and submitting commands to msageCore. The file layout of msageJS is shown in Figure 7. Inside sdkjs.js, we find a wrapper object called adsage and the JavaScript interface for command execution.

Figure 7: The file layout of msageJS

The command execution interface is constructed as follows:

          adsage.exec(className, methodName, argsList, onSuccess, onFailure);

The className and methodName parameters correspond to classes and methods in msageCore. The argsList parameter can be either a list or dict, and the exact types and values can be determined by reversing the methods in msageCore. The final two parameters are function callbacks invoked when the method exits. For example, the following invocation starts audio capture:

adsage.exec(“MSageCoreUIManager”, “captureAudio”, [“Hey”, 10, 40],  onSuccess, onFailure);

Note that the files comprising msageJS cannot be found by simply listing the files in an affected app’s IPA. The files themselves are zipped and encoded in Base64 in the data section of the ad library binary. After an affected app is launched, msageCore first decodes the string and extracts msageJS to the app’s data container, setting index.html shown in Figure 7 as the landing page in the ad library WebView to launch msageJS.

Figure 8: Base64 encoded JavaScript component in Zip format

When msageJS is launched, it sends a POST request to hxxp://entry.adsage.com/d/ to check for updates. The server responds with information about the latest msageJS version, including a download URL, as shown in Figure 9.

Figure 9: Server response to msageJS update request via HTTP POST

Enterprise Protection

To ensure the protection of our customers, FireEye has deployed detection rules in its Network Security (NX) and Mobile Threat Prevention (MTP) products to identify the affected apps and their network activities.

For FireEye NX customers, alerts will be generated if an employee uses an infected app while their iOS device is connected to the corporate network. FireEye MTP management customers have full visibility into high-risk apps installed on mobile devices in their deployment base. End users will receive on-device notifications of the risky app and IT administrators receive email alerts.

Conclusion

In this blog, we described an ad library that affected thousands of iOS apps with potential backdoor functionality. We revealed the internals of backdoors which could be used to trigger audio recording, capture screenshots, prompt the user to side-load other high-risk apps, and read sensitive data from the app’s keychain, among other dubious capabilities. We also showed how these potential backdoors in ad libraries could be controlled remotely by JavaScript code should their ad servers fall under malicious actors’ control.

[1] http://www.adsage.com/mobisage
[2] http://www.adsage.cn/
[3] https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2015/08/ios_masque_attackwe.html
[4] https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2015/02/ios_masque_attackre.html
[5] https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2014/11/masque-attack-all-your-ios-apps-belong-to-us.html
[6] https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2015/06/three_new_masqueatt.html
[7] https://www.virusbtn.com/virusbulletin/archive/2014/11/vb201411-Apple-without-shell

Credit:  Zhaofeng Chen, Adrian Mettler, Peter Gilbert , Yong Kang | Mobile Threats, Threat Research

Newly Discovered Exploit Makes Every iPhone Remotely Hackable

The government would love to get its hands on a foolproof way to break into the new highly encrypted iPhone. And it looks like some clever hackers just gave it to them.

Bug bounty startup Zerodium just announced that a team has figured out how to remotely jailbreak the latest iPhone operating system and will take home a million dollar prize. It’s unclear if Apple will get a peek at the zero-day exploit.

But wait, isn’t that what security researchers are supposed to do? Expose the exploit? Not when there’s this kind of cash on the line.

The hack itself seemed impossible. Zerodium required the exploit to work through a Safari, Chrome, a text message, or a multimedia message. This meant that hackers wouldn’t have to find just one vulnerability but rather a chain of them that would enable them to jailbreak an iPhone from afar. Once the phone’s jailbroken, the hackers could ostensibly download apps to the phone or even upload malware. It could also be a killer surveillance tool for anyone from law enforcement to spy agencies, which is what makes the details of this situation even more unsettling.

Zerodium is no ordinary security company. As Motherboard’s Lorenzo Francheschi-Biccierai explains:

[Founder Chaouki] Bekrar and Zerodium, as well as its predecessor VUPEN, have a different business model. They offer higher rewards than what tech companies usually pay out, and keep the vulnerabilities secret, revealing them only to certain government customers, such as the NSA.

Oh, that sounds bad. But it gets worse:

But there’s no doubt that for some, this exploit is extremely valuable. …This exploit would allow [law enforcement and spy agencies] to get around any security measures and get into the target’s iPhone to intercept calls, messages, and access data stored in the phone.

So unlike a lot of news that comes out of the security industry, this is a real threat. Zero-day vulnerabilities are often shared with the vendor before research is released so that they can have a patch ready. In this case, Zerodium and the winning team of now millionaire hackers will probably keep the bug a secret so that the proprietors of state secrets can take advantage of it. Again, Bekrar and his various ventures have been doing this for years.

There’s a chance Apple will figure out how to patch the vulnerability before the NSA takes off with it. After all, the Cupertino-based purveyor of very expensive gadgets is historically terrific at security. This is actually the first report of a method for jailbreaking an iPhone remotely since iOS 7. Hopefully, it will be the last.

 

 

Credit:  Adam Clark Estes – gizmodo

iOS 9 Hack: How to Access Private Photos and Contacts Without a Passcode

 

Setting a passcode on your iPhone is the first line of defense to help prevent other people from accessing your device. However, it’s pretty easy for anyone to access your personal photographs and contacts from your iPhone running iOS 9 in just 30 seconds or less, even with a passcode and/or Touch ID enabled.

 

Just yesterday, the Security firm Zerodium announced a Huge Bug Bounty of 1 Million Dollars for finding out zero-day exploits and jailbreak for iPhones and iPads running iOS9. Now…

 

A hacker has found a new and quite simple method of bypassing the security of a locked iOS device (iPhone, iPad or iPod touch) running Apple’s latest iOS 9 operating system that could allow you to access the device’s photos and contacts in 30 seconds or less. Yes, the passcode on any iOS device running iOS 9.0 is possible to bypass using the benevolent nature of Apple’s personal assistant Siri.

 

Here’s the List of Steps to Bypass Passcode:

You need to follow these simple steps to bypass passcode on any iOS device running iOS 9.0:
  1. Wake the iOS device and Enter an incorrect passcode four times.
  2. For the fifth time, Enter 3 or 5 digits (depending on how long your passcode is), and for the last one, press and hold the Home button to invoke Siri immediately followed by the 4th digit.
  3. After Siri appears, ask her for the time.
  4. Tap the Clock icon to open the Clock app, and add a new Clock, then write anything in the Choose a City field.
  5. Now double tap on the word you wrote to invoke the copy & paste menu, Select All and then click on “Share“.
  6. Tap the ‘Message‘ icon in the Share Sheet, and again type something random, hit Return and double tap on the contact name on the top.
  7. Select “Create New Contact,” and Tap on “Add Photo” and then on “Choose Photo“.
  8. You’ll now be able to see the entire photo library on the iOS device, which is still locked with a passcode. Now browse and view any photo from the Photo album individually.

Video Demonstration

You can also watch a video demonstration (given below) that shows the whole hack in action.
It isn’t a remote flaw you need to worry about, as this only works if someone has access to your iPhone or iOS device. However, such an easy way to bypass any locked iOS device could put users personal data at risk.

How to Prevent iOS 9 Hack

Until Apple fixes this issue, iOS users can protect themselves by disabling Siri on the lock screen from Settings > Touch ID & Passcode. Once disabled, you’ll only be able to use Siri after you have unlocked your iOS device using the passcode or your fingerprint.
Credit: 

 

United Airlines’ Frequent Flyer App has been hacked

United Airlines’ Frequent Flyer App Can Be Hacked to Reveal Passenger Info

Flying has never been more convenient for customers. The security checks might be a drag, but sometimes all it takes to check in online is punching in a few digits into a mobile app.

But that may be just a little too convenient. A cybersecurity company has discovered that it’s possible to obtain the personal and flight information of United Airlines MileagePlus customers through the company’s app.

“An attacker can get access to personal details such as email, phone number, flight details (origin, destination, date, time, seat) and even the boarding pass,” Yosi Dahan, co-founder and CEO of Turrisio Cybersecurity, told Motherboard in an email.

When logging into the United Airlines app to check in, a customer can either enter their booking confirmation code or MileagePlus ID and doesn’t need to give any other information, such as a password. MileagePlus is United Airline’s frequent flyer program. If the user’s flight is within 24 hours, their information will be displayed on the app.

Image: Censored screenshot provided by Dahan to show the information he uncovered

MileagePlus IDs are very basic: they come in the format of two letters, followed by six digits. So instead of having to find out the ID of a particular customer, Dahan wrote a simple Python proof-of-concept script that could allow an attacker to grind through the possible combinations of IDs and automatically check if any flights were booked with them.

There is no indication that the app has actually been abused by criminals. But Dahan, who has previously written about the MileagePlus app security, envisioned that it could be possible to launch a social engineering attack with information gleaned this way. He suggested, for instance, that an attacker could call a victim and present them with information that only United Airlines should know, then scam them into handing over credit card details.

 

 

Credit:  motherboard

DynamoRIO | Runtime Code Manipulation System

About DynamoRIO

DynamoRIO is a runtime code manipulation system that supports code transformations on any part of a program, while it executes. DynamoRIO exports an interface for building dynamic tools for a wide variety of uses: program analysis and understanding, profiling, instrumentation, optimization, translation, etc. Unlike many dynamic tool systems, DynamoRIO is not limited to insertion of callouts/trampolines and allows arbitrary modifications to application instructions via a powerful IA-32/AMD64 instruction manipulation library. DynamoRIO provides efficient, transparent, and comprehensive manipulation of unmodified applications running on stock operating systems (Windows or Linux) and commodity IA-32 and AMD64 hardware.

DynamoRIO’s powerful API abstracts away the details of the underlying infrastructure and allows the tool builder to concentrate on analyzing or modifying the application’s runtime code stream. API documentation is included in the release package and can also be browsed online.

 

 

Downloading DynamoRIO

DynamoRIO is available free of charge as a binary package for both Windows and Linux. DynamoRIO’s source code is available under a BSD license.

 

 

DynamoRIO Website: http://www.dynamorio.org