iOS 9 Hack: How to Access Private Photos and Contacts Without a Passcode

 

Setting a passcode on your iPhone is the first line of defense to help prevent other people from accessing your device. However, it’s pretty easy for anyone to access your personal photographs and contacts from your iPhone running iOS 9 in just 30 seconds or less, even with a passcode and/or Touch ID enabled.

 

Just yesterday, the Security firm Zerodium announced a Huge Bug Bounty of 1 Million Dollars for finding out zero-day exploits and jailbreak for iPhones and iPads running iOS9. Now…

 

A hacker has found a new and quite simple method of bypassing the security of a locked iOS device (iPhone, iPad or iPod touch) running Apple’s latest iOS 9 operating system that could allow you to access the device’s photos and contacts in 30 seconds or less. Yes, the passcode on any iOS device running iOS 9.0 is possible to bypass using the benevolent nature of Apple’s personal assistant Siri.

 

Here’s the List of Steps to Bypass Passcode:

You need to follow these simple steps to bypass passcode on any iOS device running iOS 9.0:
  1. Wake the iOS device and Enter an incorrect passcode four times.
  2. For the fifth time, Enter 3 or 5 digits (depending on how long your passcode is), and for the last one, press and hold the Home button to invoke Siri immediately followed by the 4th digit.
  3. After Siri appears, ask her for the time.
  4. Tap the Clock icon to open the Clock app, and add a new Clock, then write anything in the Choose a City field.
  5. Now double tap on the word you wrote to invoke the copy & paste menu, Select All and then click on “Share“.
  6. Tap the ‘Message‘ icon in the Share Sheet, and again type something random, hit Return and double tap on the contact name on the top.
  7. Select “Create New Contact,” and Tap on “Add Photo” and then on “Choose Photo“.
  8. You’ll now be able to see the entire photo library on the iOS device, which is still locked with a passcode. Now browse and view any photo from the Photo album individually.

Video Demonstration

You can also watch a video demonstration (given below) that shows the whole hack in action.
It isn’t a remote flaw you need to worry about, as this only works if someone has access to your iPhone or iOS device. However, such an easy way to bypass any locked iOS device could put users personal data at risk.

How to Prevent iOS 9 Hack

Until Apple fixes this issue, iOS users can protect themselves by disabling Siri on the lock screen from Settings > Touch ID & Passcode. Once disabled, you’ll only be able to use Siri after you have unlocked your iOS device using the passcode or your fingerprint.
Credit: 

 

Firefox Under Fire: Anatomy of latest 0-day attack

On the August 6th, the Mozilla Foundation released a security update for the Firefox web browser that fixes the CVE-2015-4495 vulnerability in Firefox’s embedded PDF viewer, PDF.js. This vulnerability allows attackers to bypass the same-origin policy and execute JavaScript remotely that will be interpreted in the local file context. This, in turn, allows attackers to read and write files on local machine as well as upload them to a remote server. The exploit for this vulnerability is being actively used in the wild, so Firefox users are advised to update to the latest version (39.0.3 at the time of writing) immediately.

In this blog we provide an analysis of two versions of the script and share details about the associated attacks against Windows, Linux and OS X systems.

According to ESET’s LiveGrid® telemetry, the server at the IP address 185.86.77.48, which was hosting the malicious script, has been up since July 27, 2015. Also we can find corroboration on one of the compromised forums:

image1

Operatives from the Department on Combating Cybercrime of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Ukraine, who responded promptly to our notification, have also confirmed that the malicious exfiltration server, hosted in Ukraine, has been online since July 27, 2015.

According to our monitoring of the threat, the server became inactive on August 8, 2015.

 

The script

The script used is not obfuscated and easy to analyze. Nevertheless, the code shows that the attackers had good knowledge of Firefox internals.

The malicious script creates an IFRAME with an empty PDF blob. When Firefox is about to open the PDF blob with the internal PDF viewer (PDF.js), new code is injected into the IFRAME (Figure 2). When this code executes, a new sandboxContext property is created within wrappedJSObject. A JavaScript function is written to the sandboxContext property. This function will later be invoked by subsequent code. Together, these steps lead to the successful bypass of the same-origin policy.

Code that creates sandboxContext property

The exploit is very reliable and works smoothly. However, it may display a warning which can catch the attention of tech-savvy users.

The warning message showed on compromised site

After successful exploitation of the bug, execution passes to the exfiltration part of code. The script supports both the Linux and Windows platforms. On Windows it searches for configuration files belonging to popular FTP clients (such as FileZilla, SmartFTP and others), SVN client, instant messaging clients (Psi+ and Pidgin), and the Amazon S3 client.

The list of collected files on Windows at the first stage of attack

These configuration files may contain saved login and password details.

On the Linux systems, the script sends following files to the remote server:

  • /etc/passwd
  • /etc/hosts
  • /etc/hostname
  • /etc/issue

It also parses the /etc/passwd file in the order to get the home directories (homedir) of users on the system. The script then searches files by mask in the home directories collected, and it avoids searching in the home directories of standard system users (such as daemon, bin, sys, sync and so forth).

The list of collected files on Linux at stage 1 of attack

It collects and uploads such files as:

  • history (bash, MySQL, PostgreSQL)
  • SSH related configuration files and authorization keys
  • Configuration files for remote access software – Remmina
  • FileZilla configuration files
  • PSI+ configuration
  • text files with possible credentials and shell scripts

As is evident here, the purpose of the first version of the malicious script was to gather data used mostly by webmasters and site administrators. This allowed attackers to move on to compromising more websites.

 

The second version

The day after Mozilla released the patch for Firefox the attackers decided to go “all-in”: they registered two new domains and improved their script.

The two new malicious domains were maxcdnn[.]com (93.115.38.136) and acintcdn[.]net (185.86.77.48). The second IP address is the same one as used in the first version. Attackers selected these names because the domains look as if they belong to a content delivery network (CDN).

The improved script on the Windows platform not only collects configuration files for applications; it also collects text files containing almost all combinations of words of possible value to attackers (such as password, accounts, bitcoins, credit cards, exploits, certificates, and so on):

List of files collected on Windows during the second attack stage

The attackers improved the Linux script by adding new files to collect and also developed code that works on the Mac OS X operating system:

List of files collected on Macs during the second stage of an attack

Some Russian-speaking commentators misattributed this code to the Duqu malware, because some variables in the code have the text “dq” in them.

 

A copycat attack

Since the bug is easy to exploit and a working copy of the script is available to cybercriminals, different attackers have started to use it. We have seen that various groups quickly adopted the exploit and started to serve it, mostly on adult sites from google-user-cache[.]com (108.61.205.41)

This malicious script does all the same things as the original script, but it collects different files:

The list of collected files used in copycat attack

 

Conclusion

The recent Firefox attacks are an example of active in-the-wild exploitation of a serious software vulnerability. The exploit shows that the malware-writers had a deep knowledge of Firefox internals. It is also an interesting one, since in most cases, exploits are used as an infection vector for other data-stealing trojans. In this instance, however, that was not necessary, because the malicious script alone was able to steal sensitive files from victims’ systems.

Additionally, the exploit started to be reused by other malware operators shortly after its discovery. This is common practice in the malware world.

ESET detects the malicious scripts as JS/Exploit.CVE-2015-4495. We also urge Firefox users to update their browser to the patched version (39.0.3). The internal Firefox PDF reader can also be disabled by changing the pdfjs.disabled setting to true.

 

Indicators of Compromise

A partial list of compromised servers:

hxxp://www.akipress.org/

hxxp://www.tazabek.kg/

hxxp://www.super.kg/

hxxp://www.rusmmg.ru/

hxxp://forum.cs-cart.com/

hxxp://www.searchengines.ru/

hxxp://forum.nag.ru/

Servers used in attack:

maxcdnn[.]com (93.115.38.136)

acintcdn[.]net (185.86.77.48)

google-user-cache[.]com (108.61.205.41)

Hashes (MD5):

0A19CC67A471A352D76ACDA6327BC179547A7A25

2B1A220D523E46335823E7274093B5D44F262049

19BA06ADF175E2798F17A57FD38A855C83AAE03B

3EC8733AB8EAAEBD01E5379936F7181BCE4886B3

 
 

Credit:  Anton Cherepanov